Caring For the Least Among Us: Economic Justice

Looking through the lens of faith, the purpose of economy is to provide all things people need to thrive and live in fullness of life.
~ Edie Rasell
This was the theme for our May 2017 Annual Meeting of the SW Wisconsin Association of the United Church of Christ held at St. John's UCC in Monroe. For those of you not familiar with our denominational structure, First Congregational is part of the SW Association, which is one of four Associations in the Wisconsin Conference. Beyond that, our Conference is part of General Synod - the national UCC body.
 
Each year we meet as an Association to conduct business we need to do at this level, such as voting on an Association budget and nominations to various committees, as well as hearing reports about how the Association is available to help local churches in ministry. But, most of our day is spent in some relevant topic for education. This year, our keynote speaker was Rev. Edie Rasell, UCC Minister for Economic Justice. She challenged us to consider the purpose of economy looking through the lens of faith. She gave us a lot of good background and current information about how economic policy is structured. In the end, this is what she said guides her decisions about what to get involved in:
 
*Our faith calls us to get into the struggle, so have a willingness to get involved.
*Ask: What am I "called" to do? What are my gifts? We can all do one small thing. Do it!
*Let go of worrying about the outcome. We can't control that.
*God is with us. We can pray for courage, help, and wisdom and know we aren't alone.
 
First Cong had good representation at the meeting with 11 members present. Workshops were offered that covered topics related to immigration, children in poverty, hunger, homelessness, and justice and witness ministry. We were each able to learn a bit more as we consider how we can address economic justice through our gifts and daily actions.
~ Ann Beaty

Posted on May 9, 2017 at 9:04 am in Featured Content.

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